2014 Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S specs, photos, pricing

2014 911 Turbo updates include a new all-wheel-drive system, active rear axle steering, adaptive aerodynamics, full-LED headlights and up to 560 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged flat six.

2014 911 Turbo updates include a new all-wheel-drive system, active rear axle steering, adaptive aerodynamics, full-LED headlights and up to 560 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged flat six.

2014 Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S

 Fifty years ago, the Porsche 911 made its debut at the Frankfurt auto Show and then 10 years later came the first 911 Turbo prototype.

Now, for the 911 Turbo’s 40th anniversary, Porsche has just released official specs, photos and pricing for the latest 911 Turbo and Turbo S, which go on sale at the end of this year.

Porsche calls the Turbo models “the technological and dynamic performance peak of the 911 series.”

Updates include a new all-wheel-drive system, active rear axle steering, adaptive aerodynamics, full-LED headlights and up to 560 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged flat six-cylinder engine.

New 20-inch wheel design.

New 20-inch wheel design.

It also rides on 3.9-inch longer wheelbase and 20-inch wheels.

Porsche’s active anti-roll system (Dynamic Chassis Control) is optional on the base turbo and standard on the Turbo S. The Turbo S also comes with extras that were once options, including the Sport Chromo Package Plus and carbon ceramic composite brakes.

All for quicker acceleration. The 911 Turbo with the optional Sport Chrono Package Plus accelerates from zero to 60 mph in 3.2 seconds, on its way to a top track speed of 196 mph.

The 911 Turbo S gets to 60 mph 2.9 seconds, with a top track speed of 198 mph.

Performance
The twin- turbocharged, direct injection 3.8-liter six produces 520 hp in the 911 Turbo and 560 hp in the S.

Power is transferred to the drivetrain through a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission (PDK), with auto start/stop at idle.

Official mileage estimates are not final, but Porsche expects improvements in real-world fuel economy.

Induction and engine sounds are piped to the cabin by a speaker diaphragm.

Wide body
Visually, the Turbos have the widest bodies: rear body panels a broader by 1.1 inches over the 911 Carrera 4. The fenders have a nearly level surface, about the width of a hand, between the C-pillar and the outer edge of the car body.

Other styling differences include forged two-tone 20-inch aluminum wheels, with center hub locks on the Turbo S.  The Turbo S also gets -LED headlights that feature four-point daytime running lights and camera-based high/low beam control (Optional for the base model).

An even wider body.

An even wider body.

Rear wheel steering
Rear wheel steering system consists of two electro-mechanical actuators (rather than conventional control links) on the left and right rear axles.

The steering angle of the rear wheels can be varied by up to 2.8 degrees, depending on vehicle speed.

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At speeds to 31 mph, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction that the front wheels are turned. That essentially corresponds to a virtual shortening of the wheelbase by 9.8 inches. The system lets the car turn faster into corners and noticeably simplifies maneuvering and parking.

Above 50 mph, the system steers the rear wheels parallel to the front wheels.

This is equivalent to a virtual lengthening of the wheelbase by 19.6 inches and gives the car tremendous directional control capability, Porsche says.

At the same time, the steering input by the driver leads to significantly faster build-up of lateral force at the rear axle, which responds to steering commands even more quickly.

The interior was completely redesigned for the Turbo, with a richer list of extras for the S model.

The interior was completely redesigned for the Turbo, with a richer list of extras for the S model.

Active aerodynamics
The new active aerodynamic system is a retractable three-stage front spoiler (pneumatically extended) and a deployable rear wing with three adjustable wing positions.

In the performance position, the entire spoiler is fully extended to add considerable down force at the front axle. The rear wing also is extended to its maximum height “with the greatest angle of attack,” Porsche said in the release.

Dynamic performance is improved so much, Porsche says, that lap times at the North Loop of the Nürburgring are improved by up to two seconds. The new 911 Turbo S carves through  the 12.8 miles of the North Loop of the Nürburgring – nicknamed “The Green Hell” by Jackie Stewart – in less than 7.6 minutes – with standard production tires.

The 2012 Corvette ZR-1 went through the same 154-turn course in 7 minutes, 19.63 seconds.

New interior
The interior was completely redesigned for the Turbo, with a richer list of extras for the S model. Its cabin is trimmed in black with Carrera red and standard 18-way power adjusted Sport Seats Plus.

A Bose sound system is standard, but for the first buyers can upgrade to Burmester system. Other options include a radar-controlled cruise control system, camera-based road sign recognition and speed limit recognition.

Turbo pricing starts at $149,250. The Turbo S starts at $182,050. Pricing includes the $950 freight charge from Zuffenhausen.

The 911 Turbo S gets to 60 mph 2.9 seconds, with a top track speed of 198 mph.

The 911 Turbo S gets to 60 mph 2.9 seconds, with a top track speed of 198 mph.

About Mark Maynard

Mark Maynard has been the automotive editor at the San Diego Union-Tribune since 1992.

He drives nearly 200 vehicles a year for review, has attended several high-performance driving schools and a few off-road driving courses.

He attends many new-vehicle press introductions and schmoozes with auto-industry execs.

Mark Maynard