Maserati 2020 updates for North America

The current Maserati lineup is comprised of the Ghibli executive sports sedan, the sixth generation of the Quattroporte flagship sedan (center), and the Levante SUV. (Maserati)

Italian marque adds standard equipment, elevates luxury options

Italian luxury vehicle marque Maserati has been a manufacturer of racing and grand-touring cars since it was established on Dec. 1, 1914, in Bologna, Italy. The “House of Trident” will mark a new era for the future of mobility and the relaunch of the Maserati brand in September at “MMXX: The Way Forward,” when it will unveil the MC20 supercar at the special event. Follow the event at 2020 Modena.

The current Maserati lineup of vehicles is comprised of three models: the sixth generation of the Quattroporte flagship sedan, the Ghibli executive sports sedan (the brand’s first midsize sedan) and the Levante SUV. Production of the Gran Turismo coupe ($135,000) and GT convertible ($151,000) ended last year, but cars might still be available at dealerships.

] Here’s a look at what is new for the 2020 model year:

The Levante now has standard soft-close doors, heated leather sport steering wheel and a dual-pane panoramic sunroof. The S GranSport is shown. (Maserati)

Levante SUV

The brand’s first SUV is named for a warm Mediterranean wind that can change from light breeze to gale force in an instant. With near perfect 50/50 weight distribution, the Levante luxury performance SUV is powered by a choice of twin-turbo V-6 or V-8 engines. The two trim levels of V-6 have 345-hp in the base model and 424-hp in the Levante S. The V-8-powered GTS and Trofeo models have 550-hp and 590-hp. Starting prices range from about $75,000 to $170,000.

For 2020, entry models now have standard soft-close doors, heated leather sport steering wheel and a dual-pane panoramic sunroof. The driver assistance package and adaptive LED matrix headlamps are also standard on the Levante GranLusso, GranSport and GTS.

Interiors can be upgraded with the Ermenegildo Zegna PELLETESSUTA woven leather in one of the 50 limited edition GranSport models.

Soft-close doors, heated leather sport steering wheels and the driver-assistance package are among the updates for 2020. A SQ4 GranSport is shown. (Maserati)

Ghibli

The midsize sport sedan takes inspiration from Maserati’s first 2+2 fastback and is named for an African desert wind. The Ghibli is available with a choice of two twin-turbo V-6 engines at 345-hp and 424-hp and available AWD on the 424-hp. Soft-close doors, heated leather sport steering wheels and the driver-assistance package are now standard on all GranSport and GranLusso trims for 2020, plus optional Skyhook Performance suspension on GranLusso trims. Starting prices range from about $71,000 to $80,000.

Column-mounted paddle shifters are offered for the S Q4 and S Q4 GranLusso. (Maserati)

Quattroporte

When it was first introduced in 1963, the Quattroporte was the world’s first luxury sport sedan and created the category, Maserati claims. The full-size flagship sedan has twin-turbocharged V-6 or V-8 powertrains. The 424-hp twin-turbo V-6 is available in rear- or all-wheel drive or in rear-drive only for the 523-hp twin-turbo V-8 model.

For 2020, optional column-mounted paddle shifters are offered for the S Q4 and S Q4 GranLusso. Soft close doors, heated leather and wood steering wheel, power rear sunblind and driver assistance package are all standard.
Interiors can be upgraded with the Ermenegildo Zegna PELLETESSUTA woven leather in one of the 50 limited edition GranSport models.

The entrance in 1965 to the Viale Ciro Menotti plant, in Modena. (Maserati)

Maserati vehicles are built at three locations:
• The historic plant on Viale Ciro Menotti, Modena, opened in 1939, is currently undergoing major upgrades to accommodate the new MC20 super sportscar.
• The Avvocato Giovanni Agnelli Plant in Grugliasco, in Turin, constructs the Quattroporte and Ghibli sedans.
• The Levante SUV is produced on its own line in the Turin Mirafiori complex.

MarkMaynard@cox.net

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