VW shows concept I.D. BUZZ Cargo van

The cargo van is close to production level, Volkswagen said in a release. The van is rear-wheel drive but all-wheel drive is possible.

Volkswagen today debuted its I.D. BUZZ CARGO, an electrically powered commercial van that recalls the vintage Transporter bus. The concept vehicle offers a glimpse into the middle of the next decade, Volkswagen says, with its fully-automated I.D. Pilot driving mode (Level 4).
The transporter concept shown at the IAA Commercial Vehicles in Hannover is a sibling of the I.D. BUZZ concept, shown at the 2017 Detroit auto show. That concept is the people-carrier version of the van format.

The people or cargo vans can be configured with different lithium-ion battery sizes with driving ranges of about 200 (48 kWh battery) or 340 miles.

The cargo van is close to production level, Volkswagen said in a release. The van is rear-wheel drive but all-wheel drive is possible.

The people or cargo vans can be configured with different lithium-ion battery sizes according to the vehicle’s purpose and budget. Based on the Modular Electric Drive Kit, driving ranges of about 200 (48 kWh battery) or 340 miles (111 kWh), are possible. A large solar roof extends the driving range by up to 9.3 miles, Volkswagen said.

Because the rear overhang was extended by about 4 inches, the cargo version is significantly longer than the people carrier.

The cargo van is 77.8 inches wide and 77.3 inches tall, with a wheelbase of 129.9 inches. Because the rear overhang was extended by about 4 inches, the cargo version is significantly longer than the people carrier, VW said. The cargo van has a payload capacity of 1,760 pounds.

Compared to Nissan’s compact NV cargo can, the I.D. BUZZ cargo is 12.5 inches longer, substantially larger van is 198.7 inches long, 9.8 inches wider and 3.8 inches taller on a wheelbase that is 14.7 inches longer.
Automakers are in a rush to develop electric vehicles for many areas of Europe that plan to ban sales of new gasoline and diesel cars and vans by 2040.

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